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Longreach begin drilling at second Moroccan onshore exploratory well

25th April 2014

London-based North African focussed exploration and production firm, Longreach Oil and Gas, has begun drilling at its second Moroccan onshore wildcat

Longreach begin drilling at second Moroccan onshore exploratory well
Kamar-1 is a key evaluation well that should add considerable knowledge to Longreach's on-going assessment of the resource potential of the highly prospective Kechoula structure located in its Sidi Moktar license in the Essaouira Basin in Morocco

Longreach Oil and Gas has started drilling at its second Moroccan onshore exploration well – Kamar-1 – on the Sidi Moktar onshore licence.

"We have set intermediate casing in Kamar-1 at approximately 1,960 metres of total vertical depth (TVD). Kamar-1 is a key evaluation well that should add considerable knowledge to our on-going assessment of the resource potential of the highly prospective Kechoula structure located in our Sidi Moktar license in the Essaouira Basin in Morocco. As expected, our drilling team encountered increasing gas content in the mud column as the Kamar-1 drill bit approached the Lower Liassic formation. Given the results of our first Moroccan well drilled in late 2013 into the Kechoula structure – Koba-1 – this gas content increase in Kamar-1 was anticipated. Based upon our detailed technical audit of the drilling of Koba-1, we have modified our Lower Liassic drilling and evaluation program and have the procedures in place at Kamar-1 to capture the necessary petrophysical data that will help map our path to exploration understanding and potential success. We expect to drill into and log the Lower Liassic zone over the next few weeks," said Dennis Sharp, Longreach’s executive chairman.

The Kamar-1 drilling and evaluation plan is to drill into the Lower Liassic, but to stop short of intersecting the analogous depth where Koba-1 encountered what, based upon technical data, the Longreach team believes is a series of fractures and the source of an influx of abnormally high-pressure water that interrupted the collection of a full suite of reservoir measurements in the Company’s first well. At Kamar-1, Longreach plans to penetrate the top of the formation, stop drilling to log and obtain gas samples and side wall cores. By using this methodical approach, the team plans to obtain data on natural gas saturations, gas composition, formation pressures, reservoir porosity, gross and net pay thickness and potential deliverability. This step-by-step incremental approach is designed for Longreach to acquire the petrophysical data that it was unable to gather in the Koba-1 well and to verify the potential of the Kechoula structure.

The Longreach technical team, led by vice president of exploration Tom Feuchtwanger, is capitalising on the extensive technical knowledge acquired while drilling Koba-1, which tapped the Lower Liassic formation and encountered an estimated 45 metres of gas-charged sands. The Kamar-1 surface location is about four kilometres southeast of Koba-1, and is expected to intersect the Lower Liassic at a deeper (200 metres) depth than at Koba-1. Longreach believes that proving the existence of a quality reservoir and natural gas at this down-dip location would make the large Kechoula inversion structure highly prospective. This confirmation would form the foundation for an extensive production testing program of Koba-1 and Kamar-1.

"We are following a disciplined, meticulous plan that continues to improve our understanding of the Kechoula potential. Each well is a technical building block to value creation. While there is always anticipation of enormous success early in any exploration program, extracting full value is a longer game that rewards patience and learning from each well, log, evaluation and interpretation," said Sharp.

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