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Ladol shipyard facility opens in Nigeria to attract foreign investment and boost deepwater output

03rd October 2014

Ladol (Lagos Deep Offshore Logistics Base) is inaugurating a facility later today intended to boost direct foreign investment in Nigeria’s oil and gas sector and raise national output by giving foreign technology and service providers a secure base of operations in West Africa

Ladol shipyard facility opens in Nigeria to attract foreign investment and boost output
Ladol spent USD 500m to construct its Deep Offshore Logistics Base specialised industrial village near Lagos to provide maritime and oil and gas services

“This is a huge milestone in the history of Ladol,” said Amy Jadesimi, Ladol CEO, in an interview with Oil & Gas Technology. “We have been developing the facility for thirty years and the ground-breaking today is a real watershed moment.”

The new shipyard has been built by Ladol and Samsung Heavy Industries Nigeria and will be West Africa’s largest vessel fabrication and integration facility, creating 50,000 new jobs in Nigeria.

Ladol spent USD 500m to construct its Deep Offshore Logistics Base specialised industrial village near Lagos to provide maritime and oil and gas services.

“Our focus and mission is to build infrastructure that will allow foreign companies to come and participate in Africa’s largest oil and gas market without having to compromise on efficiency and cost.”

“In other words they can come in here and bring their own staff or set up their own facilities, independently or jointly with us, and be able to operate in their own safe environment.”

The facility is strategically located on an island at the point of entry into Lagos harbour, directly opposite Apapa Port in the LADOL Free Zone.

“This is why the government has set up the Free Zones and supported us. They want this private investment and know that it needs a combination of indigenous investors building a place that foreign investors can come into and operate efficiently.”

The Ladol facility will be officially opened in a groundbreaking ceremony later today which will be attended by various Nigerian dignitaries, the managing director of Shell and the joint-venture representatives.

In 2010 Total signed an agreement with the Nigerian government that ensured a portion of construction for offshore projects will be performed in Nigeria. It is now possible for Total to now fulfil this promise using the Ladol shipyard, where it now plans to build at least one of its planned floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) vessels.

“This is the ideal location for Total and the only 100 per cent indigenous facility.”

Jadesima believes that through this facility the domestic engineering and construction sectors will explode.

“We have at least three major FPSO projects coming up that will cost us up to USD 30bn, with Shell saying that Nigeria will soon be their highest spend area in the world, reckoning to invest USD 40bn”

“We see the country becoming an even bigger oil and gas hub for the whole of West Africa because these largefacilities can only be built and operated in Nigeria.

“We definitely could see a shift from Asian shipyards. If you have a look at the coastline of West Africa it is incredible how few facilities and infrastructure to support the oil and gas industry. Nigeria is a major producer of oil.

“We’re following the same model as Brazil. The trajectory we are on is predictable – it is certain – and once these facilities are built we can raise sustained output.”

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