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Schlumberger launches new drill bits for Russian E&P

02nd November 2012

Viking Bits family exclusively designed to meet challenges of Russian land market, says Schlumberger

Schlumberger launches new drill bits for Russian E&P
The Viking Bits family has drilled more than 200,000 meters in multiple Russian land basins

Global oil and gas technology provider Schlumberger this month announced a new family of drill bits specifically designed to meet the challenges facing Russia’s land basins.

Schlumberger subsidiary Smith Bits has unveiled the new Viking Family of drill bits, a technology from the polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) line of products. The equipment features a cutting structure which increases drilling efficiency at both low torque and low hydraulic power. The equipment improves on standard PDC bits, whose nozzle configurations, Schlumberger says, do not produce enough hydraulic horsepower (HSI) to adequately clean the bit face, resulting in poor rate of penetration (ROP) and frequent bit trips.

“Traditional PDC bits do not perform well in many Russian land drilling applications because of low hydraulic and mechanical energy at the bit,” said Guy Arrington, president, Bits & Advanced Technologies, Schlumberger. “The Viking Bits family overcomes these challenges and improves performance with changes in the bit design.”

The Viking Bits family of drill bits is designed based on knowledge of lithology and drilling experience in Russia. The bits are manufactured in Russia, Italy and Norway and are available in either steel or matrix bodies.

The Viking Bits family has drilled more than 200,000 meters in multiple Russian land basins, Schlumberger claims. In one Eastern Siberia field, Viking Bits have increased average rates of penetration by 25 per cent, compared to nearby offset wells with similar profiles. In addition, individual run length was extended, reducing the number of overall bit trips.

In 2011, Russia became the largest producer of oil after successfully developing major onshore reserves in West Siberia.