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Oil spill response system developed for Arctic exploration

10th August 2012

Norway develops system to tackle oil spills for drilling and exploration in the Arctic

Oil spill response system developed for Arctic exploration
It is estimated that the Arctic holds between 22-25 per cent of the world’s undiscovered petroleum resources

A DNV student project has developed an oil spill response system to improve year-round drilling and exploration in the Arctic, it emerged on Thursday. The technology was the result of a seven-week student summer project organized by Norwegian Dert Nortske Veritas (DNV) foundation in Oslo, and could reduce the environmental risks of Arctic exploration, DNV said in a press release.

“We presented a realistic, innovative Arctic oil spill response system we have called the AURORA –Arctic United Response Operation and Recovery Agreement – combining new ideas and fresh insight,” project manager Martin Andestad said.

The AURORA technology is based on a multifunctional concept vessel, the Boreast. The Boreast is capable of enacting oil spill response measures in the Arctic through several technological innovations: unmanned aerial and underwater vehicles; remote in-situ burning; towable storage bladders; and an ice cleaning conveyor belt.

AURORA could help reduce the environmental risks associated with Arctic exploration, and which have been one of the greatest challenges facing the initiative to reach its energy riches. The Arctic region holds between an estimated 22-25 per cent of the world’s undiscovered petroleum resources.

The system was the result of a seven-week annual summer program organized by DNV for students in their final year of a master’s degree programme.

“I am impressed by what these ten students have been able to process and produce during seven short summer weeks,” DNV CEO Henrik O. Madsen said.