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Oil industry’s dependence on oil spill dispersants costing billions – study

22nd April 2013

New study by LAEO says ‘inefficient’ EPA guidelines have led to overspending in oil spill response measures

Oil industry’s dependence on toxic dispersants costing billions – study
The study outlines technology LAEO claims will help protect the environment and lead to substantial reductions in damages and cleanup costs to oil companies and local economies impacted by spills

An entirely new approach to oil spill problems associated with drilling, transport, pipelines and storage mishaps could find common ground between the oil industry and environmentalists, according to a new study released by the Lawrence Anthony Earth Organization (LAEO).

The analysis, titled “A Call for a Twenty-First-Century Solution in Oil Spill Response”, highlights flaws associated with current oil spill cleanup methods and outlines technology LAEO claims will help protect the environment and lead to substantial reductions in damages and cleanup costs to oil companies and local economies impacted by spills. 

Citing recent scientific papers showing that the industry’s ineffective remedies are more destructive than the oil itself, LAEO’s paper asserts the source of the problem has been the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) ‘misguidance’ in issuing guidelines that have been perpetuated and enforced throughout the industry.

“These… guidelines and ineffective remedies for spill problems have resulted in industry officials with a 25-year addiction to chemical dispersants used in our oceans and who mistakenly think that these are the best tools for managing environmental damage and profit loss from oil spill fines,” said Diane Wagenbrenner, one of the paper’s joint authors and advisory board member at LAEO.                                                            

 “We intend for this publication to correct the EPA’s inaccurate guidance documents that have been barriers to effective clean up— and we believe that even the oil companies will welcome it,” said Barbara Wiseman, LAEO’s international president and another joint author of the paper.