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Halliburton technology used to gas-power fracking rigs

18th January 2013

Halliburton tools used to convert Apache hydraulic fracturing fleet to process clean-burning US natural gas as power source

Halliburton technology used to gas-power fracking rigs
The pumping equipment has a maximum pressure rating of 20,000 pounds per square inch, a range of rates between 2.7 and 18.9 barrels per minute and a power rating of 2000 hydraulic horsepower each

US oilfield services company Halliburton has developed dual-fuel technology to allow the pumping equipment used in a fleet of hydraulic fracturing rigs owned by Texas-based oil and gas exploration company Apache Corporation to process natural gas.

Halliburton converted 12 of Apache’s new Q-10 pumps to dual-fuel, enabling them to process not only diesel fuel but also cleaner US natural gas. Halliburton delivered the Q-10 pumps in April 2012.

The pumping equipment has a maximum pressure rating of 20,000 pounds per square inch, a range of rates between 2.7 and 18.9 barrels per minute, and a power rating of 2000 hydraulic horsepower each, with all twelve pumps totalling 24,000 horsepower.

Halliburton teamed up two other companies to see the project through.
Machines and engines producer Caterpillar provided its proprietary dynamic gas blending (DGB) engine technology to power Halliburton’s massive pump.

“We anticipate that in the not-so-distant future, these DGB engines can be easily retrofitted to efficiently burn available on-site conditioned field gas, thereby saving operators additional fuel transport costs,” said Marc Edwards, senior vice president of Halliburton’s completion and production division.

Gas supplier Linde North America helped the US oilfield services company establish a gas distribution system and supplied the liquefied natural gas needed for the project.

“Apache is proud to be setting an example for the industry by using a clean-burning, abundant and inexpensive US energy source in its operations,” said Mike Bahorich, Apache’s executive vice president and chief technology officer. “Taking advantage of natural gas can lead to cost savings for the industry and for energy consumers, new jobs and a cleaner environment – it’s time for us to use this resource to its full potential.”