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DNV urges increased safety in shipping

04th June 2013

Focus on shipping safety a “main priority” for DNV after merger with GL in December

DNV urges increased safety in shipping
Over the last decade, the frequency of serious accidents has in average been almost twice as high as it was at the start of this millennium, according to DNV

Classification society DNV is putting increased focus on ship safety when identifying critical issues in shipping, following the company’s merger with GL in December, the company said in a written statement on Monday.

An extended focus on risk-based rules, safety barriers and identifying high-risk areas are means to enhance safer shipping. “Together with GL, we will have the power to take the lead in heading for these targets,” said Tor Svensen, COO Asia Pacific and president DNV Maritime and Oil & Gas.

The merger between DNV and GL was announced in December last year. “Learning through experience exchange between ship segments is essential to improve overall safety. Together, DNV and GL will be in a better position to share and develop knowledge to the benefit of the whole shipping industry.”

Accident trends – as for example penetration of hull and immobilisation of main engine - have worsened over the last decade. During that time, the frequency of serious accidents has in average been almost twice as high as it was at the start of this millennium, according to DNV. The number of life lost has not followed that trend, but stayed quite constant over time if when all ship types are taken into consideration.

Another issue raised by DNV is the safety variations between various ship segments. Offshore supply vessels are among the most technically advanced vessels and are often used for some of the most complicated operations. Nevertheless, the safety performance of offshore supply vessels is better than that of any other ship segment.

“The achievements within the offshore segment are good. Through a technology-focused proactive risk management and barrier approach, safety has been improved step by step,” Svensen said. Another key enabler for safer shipping is research and innovation. The merged class society will invest 5 per cent of its turnover in R&I. “We’re convinced that investing in R&I will be a catalyst for innovation and technology development, leading to safer and more cost-efficient shipping,” Svensen added.