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Canadian oil service firm opts for high deviation tech

23rd July 2012

Omega Completion Technology announces three year contract with Versa Line Services

Canadian oil service firm opts for high deviation tech
In conjunction with the Roller Subs, the HDTJ is able to provide both upward and downward jarring impact, whilst the HSCJ enables effective upward jarring impacts over conventional power jars," Omega’s senior business development manager Malcolm Adam told OGT

A Scottish O&G tech firm announced a three year contract with a Canadian oil service company on Monday.

Aberdeen-based Omega Completion Technology Ltd will supply Versa Line Services with equipment for high deviation intervention which will allow the Canadian firm to extend slickline and electric line operations in high angle wells.

Omega is a well completion, intervention and manufacturing company which focuses on the implementation of bespoke oilfield technologies. Versa Line is a Central Alberta based oil service company which provides slickline, electronic downhole and swabbing services, as well as flow back and fluid transportation.

“Our high deviation equipment will help Versa Line reach deviations in multiple wells they have not managed to date,” Omega’s senior business development manager Malcolm Adam told OGT. “It will allow slickline operations at deviations in excess of 78 degrees where they were previously done by coil tubing and tractors. This will give them an edge over their competitors.”

“Our initial supply has included Omega Roller Subs, our High Deviation Tubular Jar (HDTJ) and of course the Horizontal Self Cocking Jar (HSCJ),” Adam said. “In conjunction with the Roller Subs, the HDTJ is able to provide both upward and downward jarring impact, whilst the HSCJ enables effective upward jarring impacts over conventional power jars.”

In addition to the high-deviation packages, Omega will also provide technical expertise to Versa Line staff to its headquarters in Dyce, where they will undergo high-level training on how to operate the tools.

The deal follows a series of other contracts inked between Omega and major O&G firms such as Saudi Arabia’s Saudi Aramco, Schlumberger in Israel and the UK, as well as Chevron in Holland.